J. Reuben Clark Law Society

Inspirational Thoughts





October 01, 2012

Joseph Smith, Jr., as quoted by W. Cole Durham, "The Doctrine of Religious Freedom," BYU Devotional, April 3, 2001

The Saints can testify whether I am willing to lay down my life for my brethren. If it has been demonstrated that I have been willing to die for a "Mormon." I am bold to declare before Heaven that I am just as ready to die in defending the rights of a Presbyterian, a Baptist, or a good man of any other denomination; for the same principle which would trample upon the rights of the Latter-day Saints would trample upon the rights of the Roman Catholics, or of any other denomination who may be unpopular and too weak to defend themselves. It is a love of liberty which inspires my soul--civil and religious liberty to the whole of the human race.

August 24, 2012

Tim LaHaye, as quoted by Elder Jeffrey R. Holland, "Standing Together for the Cause of Christ," Ensign, August 2012

If religious Americans work together in the name of our mutually shared moral concerns, we just might succeed in re-establishing the civic moral standards that our forefathers thought were guaranteed by the [United States] Constitution. … All of our nation’s religious citizens need to develop a respect for other religious people and their beliefs. We need not accept their beliefs, but we can respect the people and realize that we have more in common with each other than we ever will with the secularizers of this country. It is time for all religiously committed citizens to unite against our common enemy.

July 19, 2012

Elder Marvin J. Ashton, It's No Fun Being Poor, Brigham Young University Devotional, March 30, 1982

A person is poor when his character is honeycombed with greed and warped by dishonesty. When we yield to misconduct under pressure, we are poor. A person who has to beg for bread is not poor if he has not bent to expediency. An individual is headed for personal bankruptcy when he sells his character and reputation for cash, honor, or convenience. We are poor in character when we think getting by is a substitute for doing our best. Virtue, action, and truth properly blended in life make a person rich. Our character is determined by how we perform in meeting life's challenges.

June 25, 2012

Derrick Bell, as quoted by Kevin J. Worthen, "Religiously Affiliated Law Schools: An Added Dimension". Life in the Law: Service and Integrity, 2009

Lawyers need conscience as well as craft. To borrow an old but picturesque phrase, skilled lawyers without conscience are like loose guns on a sinking ship, their very presence is so disconcerting that they wreak damage whether or not they hit anything.

May 22, 2012

Cardinal Francis George, O.M.I., Archbishop of Chicago, "Catholics and Latter-day Saints: Partners in the Defense of Religious Freedom," Address at Brigham Young University, February 23, 2010

[R]eligious freedom cannot be reduced to freedom of worship or even freedom of private conscience. Religious freedom means that religious groups as well as religious individuals have a right to exercise their influence in the public square, and that any attempt to reduce that fuller sense of religious freedom, which has been part of history in this country for more than two centuries, to a private reality of worship and individual conscience as long as you don't make anybody else unhappy, is not in our tradition. It was the tradition of the Soviet Union, where Lenin permitted freedom of worship (it was in the constitution of the Soviet Union) but not freedom of religion. ... This is not the American tradition, even though it is now argued by some Americans that it should be.

March 15, 2012

Kenneth W. Starr, "Acquired by Character, Not by Money," Life in the Law: Service & Integrity, at 239-240 (from a convocation address given at the Provo Tabernacle on April 27, 1990)

'I would study less, ... and think more.' For the record, I think that's sound advice, not only for law school, but--more relevantly for today's graduates--sound advice for one's entire legal career. Unfortunately, in law, as in life, there is little need to think in order just to get by. But, as Aristotle wisely opined that the unexamined life is not worth living, so too one's life in the profession that our graduates are today entering should remain--in a constructive, positive spirit--under the gentle care of a careful eye.

February 22, 2012

James E. Faust, "Be Healers". Life in the Law-Service & Integrity, p. 83

There is a great risk is justifying what we do individually and professionally on the basis of what is “legal” rather than what is “right”. In so doing, we put our very souls at risk. The philosophy that what is legal is also right will rob us of what is highest and best in our nature.

January 26, 2012

Elder Keith K. Hilbig, "Balancing Family, Church, and Profession". JRCLS Annual Fireside, January 19, 2007

How we do it all, I think, brings us back to what we started with. We're talking about balance and the three particular elements we discussed tonight: family, church, and work. Most of the world doesn't worry about that middle component, namely church. But for us it's a critical part, and I submit that it is the part that makes happiness in the other two things possible. Imagine not knowing the fullness of the restored gospel. Most people live their lives in a box: they're born and they die, and it's only what happens in between that they are aware of. We have the blessing of an eternal perspective, a prism that can look back and look ahead, and with that level of understanding we treat what happens in the box a lot differently. "So, how can we achieve balance? Because we understand the principles of the gospel and know the purpose of being here, we can apportion our time more wisely. It's a blessing to have the responsibility of knowing about the Restoration, of understanding these priciples, and as we apply them, I believe, we are empowered to carry out the balance of family, church, and work as effectively as the Lord could expect from us. We know why the family is important and that dictates our decisions. We know why Church service is critical, and that influences our decisions. We know how important it is to provide for our family and to be honest with those who have hired us. It's the best way to live, and it's certainly not a burden. It is a blessing.

November 09, 2011

Dallin H. Oaks, Truth and Tolerance, CES Fireside, September 11, 2011

The kingdom of God is like a leaven, Jesus taught (Matt. 13:33). A leaven—yeast—is hidden away in the larger mass until the whole is leavened, which means raised by its influence. . . . Since followers of Jesus Christ are commanded to be a leaven—not to be taken out of the world, but to remain in it—we must seek tolerance from those who hate us for not being of the world. As part of this, we will sometimes need to challenge laws that would impair our freedom to practice our faiths, doing so in reliance on our constitutional rights to the free exercise of religion. As described by an attorney supporting a Lutheran school in a case now before the United States Supreme Court, the big concern is “the ability of people of all faiths to work out their relationship with God and one another without the government looking over their shoulder.” That is why we need understanding and support—including your understanding and support—when we must contend for religious freedom.

October 24, 2011

James E. Faust, “The Study and Practice of the Laws of Men in Light of the Laws of God”. Life in the Law: Answering God's Interrogatories, Pg. 36

I alert you that if you practice law you must be prepared to answer people who ask how you can be a good member of the Church and a laywer. This question stems not only from misunderstanding but also from the fact that the law and lawyers are generally controversial, and many of our court and administrative proceedings are adversarial in nature. The Prince of Peace did not advocate controversy, but he was involved in it. The adversary system, imperfect as it is, has evolved as the best means of extracting the truth out of controversy. Is not truth to be sought above other virtues? . . . In my opinion there need be no conflict between what the Savior has taught through the Church and what you do as a professional lawyer. Indeed, if you are careful about observing the high moral standards that the Church represents, you will stand out in your profession.

August 10, 2011

Marion D. Hanks, "Truth: A Shield to Memory", Life in the Law: Answering God’s Interrogatories, p. 153

The one thing that a lawyer (and any other human being) needs to do is continue to broaden his or her exposure to that which is delightful, good, and uplifting in this world, limiting, to the extent possible, the opposite. Perhaps you are acquainted with the statement, 'God will hold us responsible for all the lovely things we did not enjoy in this world.'

July 26, 2011

Judge Thomas B. Griffith, "How Do We Practice Our Religion While We Practice?", Life in the Law: Service and Integrity, 2009

[O]ne cannot serve a God who has no personal needs in any other way than by working to unite His children. . . . We are divided by sex, race, class, religion, and nationality, just to name a few. By contrast, the at-one-ment of Christ is a powerful force to overcome those divisions and create a bond of unity among humankind. To build a community that extends beyond family or congregation . . . involves law. Properly understood, then, the vocation of a lawyer is to help build communities founded on the rule of law.

July 13, 2011

Francis Bacon, 1561-1626

If we do not maintain Justice, Justice will not maintain us.

May 18, 2011

Sandra Day O'Connor, "On Being Ethical Lawyers". JRCLS Annual Fireside, 2008

The hardest thing you must accept as an ethical, moral lawyer is that it is not your job to win for your client at all costs. You are an officer of the court; that means that one of the costs you must never pay is to put the law to one side.

May 04, 2011

Paul D. Clement, Former US Solicitor General

[A] representation should not be abandoned because a client's legal position is extremely unpopular in certain quarters. Defending unpopular positions is what lawyers do. The adversary system of justice depends on it, especially in cases where the passions run high. Efforts to delegitimize any representation for one side of a legal controversy are a profound threat to the rule of law. Much has been said about being on the wrong side of history. But being on the right or wrong side of history on the merits is a question for the clients. When it comes to the lawyers, the surest way to be on the wrong side of history is to abandon a client in the face of hostile criticism.

March 03, 2011

Sandra Day O'Connor, "On Being Ethical Lawyers". Life in the Law, Service and Integrity, 2009, 31

As a lawyer you are not just an advocate for your client. You are a representative of the law. It is your duty not only to act according to the highest ethical standards but to make sure that you speak up when others intend to do otherwise. Your highest fidelity is to the law; you serve your clients best by making sure that they understand the duties imposed on them both under the letter and under the spirit of the law.

September 13, 2010

James D. Gordon III, "Lawyers and the Rule of Law". Life in the Law: Service & Integrity, 2009, 295

One of the Law School's goals is to "[f]oster an enlightened devotion to the rule of law." Respect for the rule of law makes a free society possible. Without it, society could devolve into tyranny on the one hand or anarchy on the other…Lawyers help the rule of law to function. It could not exist without them.

August 10, 2010

Alexander B. Morrison, "The Challenge: Basing Your Career on Principles". Live in the Law: Answering God's Interrogatories, 2002, 93

No preparation can occur in the absence of work. What the world mistakes for genius is, as Edison pointed out, 90 percent perspiration and 10 percent inspiration. If you wish to serve, prepare yourself through study, work, and faith.

July 07, 2010

James D. Gordon III, "Lawyers and the Rule of Law". Life in the Law: Service & Integrity, 2009, 298

Lawyers have played a critical role in our country’s history. Our nation could not have been founded without the efforts of lawyers like Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, James Madison, and others. Many of the signers of the Declaration of Independence and about one-half of the signers of the Constitution were lawyers. Lawyers serve in elected and appointed positions in federal, state, and local governments. In large measure, ours is a society led by lawyers.

June 09, 2010

D. Todd Christofferson, "Confirm Thy Soul in Self-Control," Life in the Law: Answering God's Interrogatories, 2002, 75

My plea is that we do what we can to inspire principled conduct and acceptance of responsibility, first in ourselves, next at home, and then wherever our influence extends. This is not simply for the great decisions and moments in life, but most important, in the minutiae of daily life.

May 10, 2010

Sandra Day O’Connor, "On Being Ethical Lawyers", Life in the Law: Service & Integrity, 2009, 35

If we look across our nation today, we will find innumerable lawyers who are dedicated to a vision of the future in which the rule of law brings freedom and equality to all. These people work on issues that range from international affairs down to local interests. They are involved in civic organizations. They sit on corporate boards. They serve in state government and in the judiciary. I am sure that they all serve their clients zealously. But good citizen lawyers undoubtedly know that, in the long run, their clients will be best served by zealous advocacy for the future as well.

April 29, 2010

Sandra Day O’Connor, "On Being Ethical Lawyers". Life in the Law, Service and Integrity, 2009, 31

As a lawyer you are not just an advocate for your client. You are a representative of the law. It is your duty not only to act according to the highest ethical standards but to make sure that you speak up when others intend to do otherwise. Your highest fidelity is to the law; you serve your clients best by making sure that they understand the duties imposed on them both under the letter and under the spirit of the law.

February 17, 2010

Constance K. Lundberg, "The Ethical Professional". Life in the Law, 2004, 184

I believe that is the way consecration figures in our professional lives. It is not an artificial or externally imposed thing. But, by bringing understanding and love to our contacts with others—clients, opponents, judges—we can share those things most sacred to us—the spirit of the Savior, the eternal concepts of Christ’s love and the atonement—not through preaching, but through demonstration, not by announcement, but by letting others feel its sweetness and peace. I believe that we cannot perform immoral acts and pursue unethical courses if we remain true to that spirit as we bring it to our daily service.

September 08, 2009

Stephen A. West, "Pure Religion", Life in the Law, 2004, 130

The Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. spoke of religion and service: "A religion true to its nature must also be concerned about man’s social conditions. Religion deals with both earth and heaven, both time and eternity. Religion operates not only on the vertical plane but also on the horizontal. It seeks not only to integrate men with God but to integrate men with men and each man with himself".

August 03, 2009

David G. Campbell, “Satisfaction in the Law”, Life in the Law, 2004, 66

It is my hope that you will undertake your life as Woodrow Wilson counseled, “with a view to the amelioration of every undesirable condition that the law can reach, the removal of every obstacle to progress and fair dealing that the law can remove, the lightening of every burden the law can lift and the righting of every wrong the law can rectify”. If that is too tall in order, then I challenge you to accept the ABA’s goal of devoting 50 hours per year to helping others with your legal skills. Such devotion will find for you much happiness in the law.

July 08, 2009

Michael W. Mosman, "First Things First". Life in the Law, 2004, 48

But let me say also to you that my witness, and the witness of many others who could stand before you, is that in trying to put God and family first, God has sanctified my career for me – given me greater opportunities for service, enhanced my abilities, and protected me from harm. In short, I have been utilized by him, even in my career, to help build the kingdom of God on the earth. May he do so for you, and may you allow him to do so, is my prayer.

June 26, 2009

John K. Carmack, "Unmeasured Factors of Success", Life in the Law, 2004, 25

An excellent lawyer, John W. Davis, once observed: True, we build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures--unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do [as lawyers] which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state

June 12, 2009

Carl S. Hawkins, "Professional Service as a Christian Ministry". Life in the Law, 2004, 164

When the Lord commands that we love him with all our heart, might, mind and strength, he is not concerned so much with the intensity of our feelings as with the breadth and completeness of our commitment. For the committed Christian, every part of his or her being must become a living witness of love for Christ. Your life must become your ministry. Your roles as husband or wife, parent, friend, church worker, student, and lawyer must all become missions within that ministry, and your whole person, including your religion values, must become engaged, in every part of that ministry.

May 28, 2009

Ralph R. Mabey, "Just Lawyers". Life in the Law, 2004, 195

We become strong through the humility to pray, through the humility to let the Lord know that we're imperfect, and through the humility of repentance. We become strong in the practice of law through the humility to learn from the other person, to listen to others, even to adversaries and to change ourselves for the better. In conclusion I submit this: It isn't that there is a religious life we live and a lawyer's life we live and that we'd better try to reconcile them as best we can do. No, I'm proposing something maybe a little more dramatic: that they are the same life, that your calling as a lawyer under e pluribus unum is part of your calling as a disciple of Christ under Romans 12:5.

May 21, 2009

Thomas B. Griffith, "Lawyers and the Atonement". Life in the Law, 2004, 238

The rule of law, the idea that each human being is entitled to the protection of the law, is most firmly rooted and grounded when we approach an understanding of what the Savior has done for each human being. Thus, the calling of lawyers is to build communities based on the rule of law, communities that reach us in the direction of a Zion society, a place where the power of the Atonement unites us.

May 14, 2009

Tad R. Callister, "How Do Justice and Mercy Relate to the Atonement?". Life in the Law, 2004, 222

The Savior pleads our case for mercy. He is our advocate. He is the champion of our cause as no other can be. We have seen advocates of law before earthly tribunals-mere mortals who have argued their cases with spellbinding suspense, whose logic was flawless, mastery of the laws disarming, and powerful petitions compelling. Before such mortals, juries have sat in awe, almost with breathless wonder, moved and swayed by every glance, every crafted word, every passionate plea. Yet such advocates, almost Herculean heroes to their patrons, are no match to Him who pleads our case on high. He is the perfect proponent "to appear in the presence of God for us" (Hebrews 9:24). How fortunate we are that he is our "advocate with the Father"(1 John 2:1).

April 09, 2009

Alexander B. Morrison, "The Challenge: Basing Your Career on Principles." Life in the Law, 2004, 99

Adversity is the refiner's fire that bends iron but tempers steel. It is in the fire of struggle and stress that greatness is forged. A measure of your greatness as men and women will be your response to adversity, the courage you have as you wrestle with problems that can strengthen your nerves and sharpen your skill.

April 02, 2009

Carl S. Hawkins, "Professional Service as a Christian Ministry", Life in the Law: Answering God's Interrogatories, p. 166

There are two paths you can travel in seeking to accommodate your professional calling and your religious beliefs. One is the path of delusion and segmentation; the other is the path of reconciliation and integration. The path of reconciliation is the harder way, but it is the truthful way. The easy way is the delusion that you can separate your Christian aspirations from that part of yourself that is engaged in earning a living. It is easier because you can then let the secular world define your professional role for you, and you can limit your professional aspirations by the ethics of role. The study of professional ethics for lawyers is a serious and worthwhile part of your legal education. Professional ethics will lift your standards above the daily mores of commerce and politics, but they cannot be substituted for your Christian aspirations if you want to be at a peace with yourself.

March 26, 2009

Marion D. Hanks, "Truth: A Shield to Memory, Life in the Law: Answering God's Interrogatories, p. 153

The one thing that a lawyer (and any other human being) needs to do is continue to broaden his or her exposure to that which is delightful, good, and uplifting in this world, limiting, to the extent possible, the opposite. Perhaps you are acquainted with the statement, "God will hold us responsible for all the lovely things we did not enjoy in this world."

March 19, 2009

Chinese Proverb, Quoted in "The Challenge: Basing Your Career on Principles" by Alexander B. Morrison. Life in the Law, 2004, 93

To live and not learn is not living; To learn and not understand is not learning; To understand and not do is not understanding.

March 12, 2009

Merrill J. Bateman, "Atonement- Infinite and Eternal." Clark Memorandum, Fall 1995, 22-29

The atonement of the Lord Jesus Christ is the most transcendent event in history. It is the central feature of the Father's plan to open the door for his children to return to him and obtain a fullness of joy. It is the foundation of the gospel plan and gives meaning and hope to mortality.

March 05, 2009

Dallin H. Oaks, "Values." Clark Memorandum, Spring 1991, 10-15

The most important idea for any of us is that this life, with all its advantages and disadvantages, is only temporary. It is part of a larger whole, Our challenge is to develop the perspectives to realize and the strength to act upon the realization that the really important achievements of this life are those that carry enduring, favorable consequences for the eternities to come.

February 26, 2009

Jeffrey R. Holland, "The Ministry of Angels." Ensign, November 2008, 29-31

In the course of life all of us spend time in "dark and dreary" places, wildernesses, circumstances of sorrow or fear or discouragement. Our present day is filled with global distress over financial crises, energy problems, terrorist attacks, and natural calamities. These translate into individual and family concerns not only about homes in which to live and food available to eat but also about the ultimate safety and well-being of our children and the latter-day prophecies about our planet. More serious than these-and sometimes related to them-are matters of ethical, moral, and spiritual decay seen in populations large and small, at home and abroad. But I testify that angels are still sent to help us, even as they were sent to help Adam and Eve, to help the prophets, and indeed to help the Savior of the world Himself. Matthew records in his gospel that after Satan had tempted Christ in the wilderness "angels came and ministered unto him." Even the Son of God, a God Himself,had need for heavenly comfort during His sojourn in mortality. And so such ministrations will be to the righteous until the end of time.

February 19, 2009

Joseph B. Wirthlin, "Lessons Learned in the Journey of Life." Ensign, May 2001, 35

Make up your mind to be happy-even when you don't have money, even when you don't have a clear complexion, even when you don't have the Nobel Prize. Some of the happiest people I know have none of these things the world insists are necessary for satisfaction and joy. Why are they happy? I suppose it is because they don't listen very well. Or they listen too well-to the things their hearts tell them. They glory in the beauty of the earth. They glory in the rivers and the canyons and the call of the meadowlark. They glory in the love of their families, the stumbling steps of a toddler, the wise and tender smile of the elderly. They glory in honest labor. They glory in the scriptures. They glory in the presence of the Holy Ghost. One thing I know for certain: the time we have here goes by far too quickly. Don't waste any more time sitting on the bench watching life pass you by.

February 12, 2009

James E. Faust, "An Attitude of Gratitude." New Era, November 1993, 4

A grateful heart is a beginning of greatness. It is an expression of humility. It is a foundation for the development of such virtues as prayer, faith, courage, contentment, happiness, love, and well-being. But there is a truism associated with all types of human strength: "Use it or lose it." When not used, muscles weaken, skills deteriorate, and faith disappears.

February 05, 2009

Hans B. Ringger, "Choose You This Day." Ensign, May 1990, 25

Money alone does not lift the burdens of our fellowmen, and many of us live in a time and place where there is little to spare. The world is in need of time, and if we have but one hour to spare, we are wealthy. It takes time to listen and to comfort, it takes time to teach and to encourage, and it takes time to feed and to clothe. We all have the gift to lift each other's burdens and to make a difference in somebody's life. The needy are all around us. Too often, however, we are blind to those needs or fear those people whose company makes us feel uncomfortable. Yes, we admire people and organizations for the numerous services they render; and yes, we rejoice in the tremendous social changes many countries experienced during the last few months. But our admiration and interest are not enough. People at home and abroad need our help. Let us decide to serve now, even if that means leaving the comfort of our homes temporarily.

January 15, 2009

Lorenzo Snow, Quoted in "Happiness, Your Heritage" by Dieter F. Uchtdorf. Ensign, November 2008, 117-120

When you find yourselves a little gloomy, look around you and find somebody that is in a worse plight than yourself; go to him and find out what the trouble is, then try to remove it with the wisdom which the Lord bestows upon you; and the first thing you know, your gloom is gone, you feel light, the Spirit of the Lord is upon you, and everything seems illuminated.

January 08, 2009

David A. Bednar, "The Tender Mercies of the Lord." Ensign, May 2005, 99

We should not underestimate or overlook the power of the Lord's tender mercies. The simpleness, the sweetness, and the constancy of the tender mercies of the Lord will do much to fortify and protect us in the troubled times in which we do now and will yet live. When words cannot provide the solace we need or express the joy we feel, when it is simply futile to attempt to explain that which is unexplainable, when logic and reason cannot yield adequate understanding about the injustices and inequities of life, when mortal experience and evaluation are insufficient to produce a desired outcome, and when it seems that perhaps we are so totally alone, truly we are blessed by the tender mercies of the Lord and made mighty even unto the power of deliverance (see 1 Ne. 1:20).

December 11, 2008

Thomas S. Monson, "What is Christmas." Ensign, December 1998, 2

This is a glorious time of the year, simple in origin, deep in meaning, beautiful in tradition and custom, rich in memories, and charitable in spirit. It has an attraction to which our hearts are readily drawn. This joyful season brings to each of us a measure of happiness that corresponds to the degree in which we have turned our mind, feelings, and actions to the spirit of Christmas.

November 27, 2008

H. Burke Peterson, "Selflessness: A Pattern for Happiness." Ensign, May 1985, 65

A selfless person is one who is more concerned about the happiness and well-being of another than about his or her own convenience or comfort, one who is willing to serve another when it is neither sought for nor appreciated, or one who is willing to serve even those whom he or she dislikes. A selfless person displays a willingness to sacrifice, a willingness to purge from his or her mind and heart personal wants, and needs, and feelings. Instead of reaching for and requiring praise and recognition for himself, or gratification of his or her own wants, the selfless person will meet these very human needs for others. Remember the words of the Savior as he taught his disciples on an occasion when personal recognition was being sought: "But Jesus called them to him, and saith unto them, ... whosoever will be great among you, shall be your minister: And whosoever of you will be the chiefest, shall be servant of all. For even the son of man came not to be ministered unto, but to minister, and to give his life a ransom for many." (Mark 10: 42-45.)

November 20, 2008

Joseph B. Wirthlin, "Live in Thanksgiving Daily." Ensign, September 2001, 6

Gratitude turns a meal into a feast and drudgery into delight. It softens our grief and heightens our pleasure. It turns the simple and common into the memorable and transcendent. It forges bonds of love and fosters loyalty and admiration.

November 13, 2008

N. Eldon Tanner, "Love One Another." Ensign, October 1972, 2

By seriously trying to apply the Golden Rule that the Savior gave to us, we will find greater joy, success, satisfaction, and friendship as we go through life, and we will enjoy the love of others and the Spirit of our Father in heaven. If we will always look for the best in others, in our friends, in our neighbors, in our wife, in our husband, in our children, they will turn out to be the most wonderful people in the world. On the other hand, if we are looking for their weaknesses and faults and enlarge upon them, these same people may become even despicable.

November 06, 2008

Joseph B. Wirthlin, "Three Choices." Ensign, November 2003, 78

Tomorrow's joy or tomorrow's despair has its roots in decisions we make today. Perhaps some people think to themselves: "I know I need to change some things in my life. Maybe later, but not now." Those who stand at the threshold of life always waiting for the right time to change are like the man who stands at the bank of a river waiting for the water to pass so he can cross on dry land. Today is the day of decision.

October 23, 2008

W. Jeffrey Marsh, "Remember How Merciful the Lord Hath Been." Ensign, April 2000, 18

The Savior began His mortal ministry by making reference to this prophecy of Isaiah: "The Spirit of the Lord God is upon me; because the Lord hath anointed me to preach good tidings unto the meek; he hath sent me to bind up the brokenhearted, to proclaim liberty to the captives, ...to comfort all that mourn, ... to give unto them beauty for ashes, the oil of joy for mourning, the garment of praise for the spirit of heaviness" (Isaiah 61: 1-3). All of us realize that in His Atonement and Resurrection, He did something for us we could not do for ourselves. But the spirit of Isaiah's prophecy is that Christ would do something more. Besides providing a way for us to escape the demands of justice, and beyond enabling the Resurrection of all mankind, our Savior would extend mercy to help us in time of need. His mercy is the ultimate expression of His love for us. As Isaiah explained, He will teach us, comfort us, give us beauty, anoint us with the oil of joy, and clothe us with the garment of praise. The Atonement provides eternal life, but it is also a real power that helps us throughout life. It is our immediate help as well as our eternal hope.

October 16, 2008

Gary K. Palmer, "The Power of Laughter." Ensign, September 2007, 32-35

On average, children laugh 400 times a day, while adults laugh about 15 times. Why the gap? Did we lose something? Have we forgotten the way we used to be? Why is it that children seem to cope with life's oddities better than adults? Perhaps it's because they do not fully understand. But I think it's simpler than that-they laugh. As we grow older, we get far too serious. Watch children play. They don't need expensive toys to entertain them. Everything is fun. They are spontaneous. Only when we become adults do we start to get boring. Do we need to cultivate a different attitude? Humor is in the way we see things, the way we think. It's an attitude, not an event. Perhaps the key lies in becoming more childlike.

October 09, 2008

Jeffrey R. Holland, "The Peaceable Things of the Kingdom." Ensign, November 1996, 82

Christ and His angels and His prophets forever labor to buoy up our spirits, steady our nerves, calm our hearts, send forth with renewed strength and resolute hope. They wish all to know that "if God be for us, who can be against us?" In the world we shall have tribulation, but we are to be of good cheer. Christ has overcome the world. Through His suffering and His obedience He has earned and rightly bears the crown of "Prince of Peace."

October 02, 2008

Robert J. Whetten, "Strengthen Thy Brethren." Ensign, May 2005, 91-93

Every unselfish act of kindness and service increases your spirituality. God would use you to bless others. Your continued spiritual growth and eternal progress are very much wrapped up in your relationships-in how you treat others. Do you indeed love others and become a blessing in their lives? Isn't the measure of the level of your conversion how you treat others? The person who does only those things in the Church that concern himself alone will never reach the goal of perfection. Service to others is what the gospel and exalted life are all about. In your journey through life, you are to reach out and bless the lives of your fellow travelers, to give of yourself to those who need you. "For whosoever will save his life," the Master said, "shall lose it; but whosoever shall lose his life for my sake and the gospel's, the same shall save it."

September 18, 2008

Quentin L. Cook, "Live by Faith and Not by Fear." Ensign, November 2007, 70-73

It is our faith in Jesus Christ that sustains us at the crossroads of life's journey. It is the first principle of the gospel. Without it we will spin our wheels at the intersection, spending our precious time but getting nowhere. It is Christ who offers the invitation to follow Him, to give Him our burden, and to carry His yoke, "for [His] yoke is easy, and [His] burden is light".

September 11, 2008

Marvin J. Ashton, "The Time is Now." Ensign, May 1975, 85

To people so inclined, the better future may never come. The pleasant future belongs to those who properly use today. We need to find the abundant life as we go along. How can we be happy tomorrow if our "nows" are filled with self-inflicted unhappinesses and unwise delays? Generally speaking, those inclined to count their daily blessings have more to count because they help make more possible as they learn gratitude. A constant waiting for a brighter future may cause us to lose the beautiful today. Some spend so much time getting ready to live for an unknown future, too late they discover there is no time to live. Very often in our anxiousness for the joys of the future we run away from the very things we are wanting and needing today. An appropriate examination of the passing moment will prove it leads to eternity. We need to constantly remind ourselves eternity is in process now.

September 04, 2008

M. Russell Ballard, "The Atonement and the Value of One Soul." Ensign, May 2004, 84

Brothers and sisters, I believe that if we could truly understand the Atonement of the Lord Jesus Christ, we would realize how precious is one son or daughter of God. I believe our Heavenly Father's everlasting purpose for His children is generally achieved by the small and simple things we do for one another. At the heart of the English word atonement is the word one. If all mankind understood this, there would never be anyone with whom we would not be concerned, regardless of age, race, gender, religion, or social or economic standing. We would strive to emulate the Savior and would never be unkind, indifferent, disrespectful, or insensitive to others.

August 28, 2008

James E. Faust, "The Gift of the Holy Ghost--A Sure Compass." Ensign, May 1989, 31

I believe that the Spirit of the Holy Ghost is the greatest guarantor of inward peace in our unstable world. It can be more mind-expanding and can make us have a better sense of well-being than any chemical or other earthly substance. It will calm nerves; it will breath peace to our souls. This Comforter can be with us as we seek to improve. It can function as a source of revelation to warn us of impending danger and also help keep us from making mistakes. It can enhance our natural senses so that we can see more clearly, hear more keenly, and remember what we should remember. It is a way of maximizing our happiness.

August 21, 2008

Thomas S. Monson, "Treasure of Eternal Value." Ensign, April 2008, 4-9

Professor Harold Hill, in Meredith Willson's The Music Man, cautioned, "You pile up enough tomorrows, and you'll find you've collected a lot of empty yesterdays." There is no tomorrow to remember if we don't do something today, and to live most fully today, we must do that which is of greatest importance. Let us not procrastinate those things which matter most.

August 14, 2008

Richard G. Scott, "The Sustaining Power of Faith in Times of Uncertainty and Testing." Ensign, May 2003, 75

Even if you exercise your strongest faith, God will not always reward you immediately according to your desires. Rather, God will respond with what in His eternal plan is best for you. He loves you to a depth and completeness you cannot conceive of in your mortal state. Indeed, were you to know His entire plan, you would never ask for that which is contrary to it even though your feelings tempt you to do so. Sincere faith gives understanding and strength to accept the will of our Heavenly Father when it differs from our own. We can accept His will with peace and assurance, confident that His infinite wisdom surpasses our own ability to comprehend fully His plan as it unfolds a piece at a time.

August 07, 2008

Jack H. Goaslind, "Look to the Future with Optimism." Ensign, April 1997, 22

It has been said that prayer keeps man from sin, and sin keeps man from prayer. Powerful talks have been given and beautiful stories shared about the power of prayer in our lives. I have learned that there is no more faith-promoting and discouragement-chasing experience than to kneel before God and, through the Holy Ghost and in the name of Jesus Christ, pour out our hearts to a loving God who knows us, understands our needs, and desires to bless us.

July 31, 2008

Jeffrey R. Holland, "What I Wish Every New Member Knew--and Every Longtime Member Remembered." Ensign, October 2006, 10-16

If we constantly focus only on the stones in our mortal path, we will almost surely miss the beautiful flower or cool stream provided by the loving Father who outlined our journey. Each day can bring more joy than sorrow when our mortal and spiritual eyes are open to God's goodness. Joy in the gospel is not something that begins only in the next life. It is our privilege now, this very day. We must never allow our burdens to obscure our blessings. There will always be more blessings than burdens--even if some days it doesn't seem so. Jesus said, "I am come that they might have life, and that they might have it more abundantly." Enjoy those blessings right now. They are yours and always will be.

July 23, 2008

Richard G. Scott, "Finding Joy in Life." Ensign, May 1996, 24

Do you take time to discover each day how beautiful your life can be? How long has it been since you watched the sun set? The departing rays kissing the clouds, trees, hills, and lowlands good night, sometimes tranquilly, sometimes with exuberant bursts of color and form. What of the wonder of a cloudless night when the Lord unveils the marvels of His heavens-the twinkling stars, the moonlight rays-to ignite our imagination with His greatness and glory? How captivating to watch a seed planted in fertile soil germinate, gather strength, and send forth a tiny, seemingly insignificant sprout. Patiently it begins to grow and develop its own character led by the genetic code the Lord has provided to guide its development. With care it surely will become what it is destined to be: a lily, crowned with grace and beauty; a fragrant spearmint plant; a peach; an avocado; or a beautiful blossom with unique delicacy, hue, and fragrance. When last did you observe a tiny rosebud form? Each day it develops new and impressive character, more promise of beauty until it becomes a majestic rose. You are one of the noblest of God's creations. His intent is that your life be gloriously beautiful regardless of your circumstances. As you are grateful and obedient, you can become all that God intends you to be.

July 17, 2008

Spencer W. Kimball, "Let Us Not Weary In Well Doing." Ensign, May 1980, 80

Let us hold fast to the iron rod. The Savior urged us to put our hand to the plow without looking back. In that spirit we are being asked to have humility and a deep and abiding faith in the Lord and to move forward--trusting in him, refusing to be diverted from our course, either by the ways of the world or the praise of the world. I see that quality of readiness and devotion in our people today. There is so much yet to be done! Let us, then, move forward; let us continue the journey with lengthened stride. The Lord will lead us along, and he will be in our midst and not forsake us.

July 03, 2008

Richard G. Scott, "Finding Joy in Life." Ensign, May 1996, 24

Your joy in life depends upon your trust in Heavenly Father and His holy Son, your conviction that their plan of happiness truly can bring you joy. Pondering their doctrine will let you enjoy the beauties of this earth and enrich your relationships with others. It will lead you to the comforting, strengthening experiences that flow from prayer to Father in Heaven and the answers He gives in return. A pebble held close to the eye appears to be a gigantic obstacle. Cast on the ground, it is seen in perspective. Likewise, problems or trials in our lives need to be viewed in the perspective of scriptural doctrine. Otherwise they can easily overtake our vision, absorb our energy, and deprive us of the joy and beauty the Lord intends us to receive here on earth. Some people are like rocks thrown into a sea of problems. They are drowned by them. Be a cork. When submerged in a problem, fight to be free to bob up to serve again with happiness.

June 26, 2008

Gordon B. Hinckley, "Let Love be the Lodestar of Your Life." Ensign, May 1989, 65

Great beyond comprehension is the love of God. He is our loving Eternal Father. Out of His love for us, He has given an eternal plan which, when followed, leads to exaltation in His kingdom. Out of His love for us, He sent His Firstborn into the world, who, out of His own divine love, gave Himself as a sacrifice for each of us. His was an incomparable gift of love to a world that largely spurned Him. He is our great exemplar. We should let love become the lodestar of our lives, with the absolute assurance that, because of the love of God our Eternal Father and His own beloved Son, our salvation from the bonds of death is sure and our opportunity for eternal exaltation is certain. Let that divine love, shed on us, be reflected from our lives onto others of our Father's children.

June 19, 2008

Joseph F. Smith, Quoted in "By Their Fruits, Ye Shall Know Them" by Royden G. Derrick. Ensign, November 1984, 61

The knowledge of truth, combined with proper regard for it, and its faithful observance, constitutes true education. The mere stuffing of the mind with a knowledge of facts is not education. The mind must not only possess a knowledge of truth, but the soul must revere it, cherish it, love it as a priceless gem; and this human life must be guided and shaped by it in order to fulfill its destiny.

June 12, 2008

Thomas S. Monson, "An Attitude of Gratitude." Ensign, May 1992, 54

This is a wonderful time to be living here on earth. Our opportunities are limitless. While there are some things wrong in the world today, there are many things right, such as teachers who teach, ministers who minister, marriages that make it, parents who sacrifice, and friends who help. We can lift ourselves, and others as well, when we refuse to remain in the realm of negative thought and cultivate within our hearts an attitude of gratitude. If ingratitude be numbered among the serious sins, then gratitude takes its place among the noblest of virtues.

June 05, 2008

Howard W. Hunter"The God that Doest Wonders." Ensign, May 1989, 15, "The God that Doest Wonders." Ensign, May 1989, 15

As a result of the many miracles in our lives, we should be more humble and more grateful, more kind and more believing. When we are personal witnesses to these wonders which God performs, it should increase our respect and love for him; it should improve the way we behave. We will live better and love more if we will remember that. We are miracles in our own right, every one of us, and the resurrected Son of God is the greatest miracle of all. He is, indeed, the miracle of miracles, and every day of his life he gave evidence of it. We should try to follow after him in that example.

May 29, 2008

Ronald A. Rasband, "Special Experiences." Ensign, May 2008, 11-12

Our personal journey through life provides us with many special experiences that become building blocks of faith and testimony. These experiences come to us in vastly different ways and at unpredictable times. They can be powerful spiritual events or small enlightening moments. Some experiences will come as serious challenges and heavy trials that test our ability to cope with them. No matter what the experience may be, each gives us a chance for personal growth, greater wisdom, and, in many cases, service to others with more empathy and love. As the Lord stated to the Prophet Joseph Smith in a reassuring way during one of his most significant trials at Liberty Jail, "All these things shall give thee experience, and shall be for thy good".

May 22, 2008

Spencer W. Kimball, "The Abundant Life." Ensign, July 1978, 3

Service to others deepens and sweetens this life while we are preparing to live in a better world. It is by serving that we learn how to serve. When we are engaged in the service of our fellowmen, not only do our deeds assist them, but we put our own problems in a fresher perspective. When we concern ourselves more with others, there is less time to be concerned with ourselves! In the midst of the miracle of serving, there is the promise of Jesus that by losing ourselves, we find ourselves! Not only do we "find" ourselves in terms of acknowledging divine guidance in our lives, but the more we serve our fellowmen in appropriate ways, the more substance there is to our souls. We become more significant individuals as we serve others. We become more substantive as we serve others--indeed, it is easier to "find" ourselves because there is so much more of us to find!

May 15, 2008

Joseph B. Wirthlin, "Concern for the One." Ensign, May 2008, 17-20

The Lord did not people the earth with a vibrant orchestra of personalities only to value the piccolos of the world. Every instrument is precious and adds to the complex beauty of the symphony. All of Heavenly Father's children are different in some degree, yet each has his own beautiful sound that adds depth and richness to the whole.

May 08, 2008

Henry B. Eyring, "This Day." Ensign, May 2007, 89-91

Hard as things seem today, they will be better in the next day if you choose to serve the Lord this day with your whole heart. Your circumstances may not be improved in all the ways which you desire. But you will have been given new strength to carry your burdens and new confidence that when your burdens become too heavy, the Lord, whom you have served, will carry what you cannot. He knows how. He prepared long ago. He suffered your infirmities and your sorrows when He was in the flesh so that He would know how to succor you.

May 01, 2008

Gordon B. Hinckley, Quoted in "Facing the Future with Hope" by Lowell M. Snow. Ensign, December 2007, 48-51

It isn't as bad as you sometimes think it is. It all works out. Don't worry. I say that to myself every morning. It all works out in the end. Put your trust in God, and move forward with faith and confidence in the future. The Lord will not forsake us. He will not forsake us. If we will put our trust in Him, if we will pray to Him, if we will live worthy of His blessings, He will hear our prayers.

April 17, 2008

Spencer W. Kimball, Quoted in "A Vision of What We Can Be" by James E. Faust. Ensign, March 1996, 10

Happiness does not depend upon what happens outside of you, but on what happens inside of you. It is measured by the spirit with which you meet the problems of life.

April 10, 2008

David A. Bednar, "Clean Hands and a Pure Heart." Ensign, November 2007, 80-83

Let me suggest that hands are made clean through the process of putting off the natural man and by overcoming sin and the evil influences in our lives through the Savior's Atonement. Hearts are purified as we receive His strengthening power to do good and become better. All of our worthy desires and good works, as necessary as they are, can never produce clean hands and a pure heart. It is the Atonement of Jesus Christ that provides both a cleansing and redeeming power that helps us to overcome sin and a sanctifying and strengthening power that helps us to become better than we ever could by relying only upon our own strength. The infinite Atonement is for both the sinner and for the saint in each of us.

April 03, 2008

Gene R. Cook, "Faith in the Lord Jesus Christ." New Era, October 1982, 4

My brothers and sisters, today is a day of miracles. We believe in miracles. The Latter-day Saints may expect miracles according to their faith. As a member of this Church, you are authorized to take a leading part in the development of the kingdom of God on earth within your respective responsibilities. Pray fervently. Actively seek to increase your faith, and with that great gift from God, you can cause great things to occur within your life and in the lives of others.

April 03, 2008

Gene R. Cook, "Faith in the Lord Jesus Christ." New Era, October 1982, 4

My brothers and sisters, today is a day of miracles. We believe in miracles. The Latter-day Saints may expect miracles according to their faith. As a member of this Church, you are authorized to take a leading part in the development of the kingdom of God on earth within your respective responsibilities. Pray fervently. Actively seek to increase your faith, and with that great gift from God, you can cause great things to occur within your life and in the lives of others.

March 27, 2008

Dallin H. Oaks, "The Challenge to Become." Ensign, November 2000, 32-34

It is not even enough for us to be convinced of the gospel; we must act and think so that we are converted by it. In contrast to the institutions of the world, which teach us to know something, the gospel of Jesus Christ challenges us to become something.

March 20, 2008

Robert D. Hales, "If Thou Wilt Enter into Life, Keep the Commandments." Ensign, May 1996, 35

The commandments are not a burden or a restriction. Every commandment of the Lord is given for our development, progress, and growth. The Prophet Joseph Smith taught: "God has designed our happiness. ...He never will institute an ordinance or give a commandment to His people that is not calculated in its nature to promote that happiness which He has designed."

March 13, 2008

Thomas S. Monson, "How Firm a Foundation." Ensign, November 2006, 62, 67-68

As we pray, let us really communicate with our Father in Heaven. It is easy to let our prayers become repetitious, expressing words with little or no thought behind them. When we remember that each of us is literally a spirit son or daughter of God, we will not find it difficult to approach Him in prayer. He knows us; He loves us; He wants what is best for us. Let us pray with sincerity and meaning, offering our thanks and asking for those things we feel we need. Let us listen for His answers, that we may recognize them when they come. As we do, we will be strengthened and blessed. We will come to know Him and His desires for our lives. By knowing Him, by trusting His will, our foundations of faith will be strengthened. If any one of us has been slow to hearken to the counsel to pray always, there is no finer hour to begin than now. William Cowper declared, "Satan trembles when he sees the weakest saint upon his knees".

March 07, 2008

Thomas S. Monson, "How Firm a Foundation." Ensign, November 2006, 62, 67-68

Along your pathway of life you will observe that you are not the only traveler. There are others who need your help. There are feet to steady, hands to grasp, minds to encourage, hearts to inspire, and souls to save.

February 29, 2008

Richard C. Edgley, "Three Towels and a 25-Cent Newspaper." Ensign, November 2006, 72-74

Honesty should be among the most fundamental values that govern our everyday living. When we are true to the sacred principles of honesty and integrity, we are true to our faith, and we are true to ourselves.

February 22, 2008

Jeffrey R. Holland, "The Tongue of Angels." Ensign, May 2007, 16-18

Our words, like our deeds, should be filled with faith and hope and charity, the three great Christian imperatives so desperately needed in the world today. With such words, spoken under the influence of the Spirit, tears can be dried, hearts can be healed, lives can be elevated, hope can return, confidence can prevail.

February 14, 2008

Joseph B. Wirthlin, "The Great Commandment." Ensign, November 2007, 28-13

The most cherished and sacred moments of our lives are those filled with the spirit of love. The greater the measure of our love, the greater is our joy. In the end, the development of such love is the true measure of success in life.

February 07, 2008

Joseph Smith, Quoted in "Thy Will Be Done, Oh Lord" by Franklin D. Richards. Ensign, January 1973, 71

Happiness is the object and design of our existence; and will be the end thereof, if we pursue the path that leads to it; and this path is virtue, uprightness, faithfulness, holiness, and keeping all the commandments of God.

January 31, 2008

Boyd K. Packer, "Do Not Fear." Ensign, May 2004, 77

True doctrine, understood, changes attitudes and behavior. The study of the doctrines of the gospel will improve behavior quicker than a study of behavior will improve behavior.

January 24, 2008

Gordon B. Hinckley, "Inspirational Thoughts." Ensign, August 1997, 3

Prayer unlocks the powers of heaven in our behalf. Prayer is the great gift which our Eternal Father has given us by which we may approach Him and speak with Him in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ. Be prayerful. You cannot make it alone. You cannot reach your potential alone. You need the help of the Lord.

January 18, 2008

Joseph B. Wirthlin, "The Great Commandment." Ensign, November 2007, 28-31

True love lasts forever. It is eternally patient and forgiving. It believes, hopes, and endures all things. That is the love our Heavenly Father bears for us. We all yearn to experience love like this. Even when we make mistakes, we hope others will love us in spite of our shortcomings--even if we don't deserve it. Oh, it is wonderful to know that our Heavenly Father loves us--even with all our flaws! His love is such that even should we give up on ourselves, He never will. We see ourselves in terms of yesterday and today. Our Heavenly Father sees us in terms of forever. Although we might settle for less, Heavenly Father won't, for He sees us as the glorious beings we are capable of becoming.

January 10, 2008

Proclamation of Civil Rights Week, December 1955, Quoted in "Just and Holy Principles: An Examination of the U.S. Constitution" by Arvo Van Alstyne. Ensign, August 1987, 6

Liberty is not any one man's possession. When a man asks freedom for himself alone, both he and his neighbor lose what he thinks he has gained. The spirit of liberty is more than jealousy for your own rights. It is a decent respect for the rights and opinions of others. We are free, not because we have freedom, but because we serve freedom. The love of liberty cannot be separated from loving your neighbor as yourself.

December 20, 2007

Howard W. Hunter, "The Gifts of Christmas." Ensign, December 2002, 16

This Christmas, mend a quarrel. Seek out a forgotten friend. Dismiss suspicion and replace it with trust. Write a letter. Give a soft answer. Encourage youth. Manifest your loyalty in word and deed. Keep a promise. Forgo a grudge. Forgive an enemy. Apologize. Try to understand. Examine your demands on others. Think first of someone else. Be kind. Be gentle. Laugh a little more. Express your gratitude. Welcome a stranger. Gladden the heart of a child. Take pleasure in the beauty and wonder of the earth. Speak your love and then speak it again. Christmas is a celebration, and there is no celebration that compares with the realization of its true meaning -- with the sudden stirring of the heart that has extended itself unselfishly in the things that matter most.

December 13, 2007

Joseph B. Wirthlin, "The Great Commandment." Ensign, November 2007, 28-31

At the final day the Savior will not ask about the nature of our callings. He will not inquire about our material possessions or fame. He will ask if we ministered to the sick, gave food and drink to the hungry, visited those in prison, or gave succor to the weak. When we reach out to assist the least of Heavenly Father's children, we do it unto Him. That is the essence of the gospel of Jesus Christ.

December 06, 2007

Gordon B. Hinckley, "Inspirational Thoughts." Ensign, October 2003, 2-5

We must look after the individual. Christ always spoke of individuals. He healed the sick, individually. He spoke His parables of individuals. This Church is concerned with individuals, notwithstanding our numbers. Whether they be 6 or 10 or 12 or 50 million, we must never lose sight of the fact that the individual is the important thing.

November 30, 2007

Joseph Smith, Quoted in "The Great Commandment" by Joseph B. Wirthlin. Ensign, November 2007, 28-31

Love is one of the chief characteristics of Deity, and ought to be manifested by those who aspire to be the sons of God. A man filled with the love of God, is not content with blessing his family alone, but ranges through the whole world, anxious to bless the whole human race.

November 21, 2007

Richard L. Evans, Quoted in "Gratitude and Thanksgiving" by Marion G. Romney. Ensign, November 1982, 49

Gratefully we acknowledge the infinite mind of our Maker, and gratefully ought to offer our tithes and offerings, and earnestly consistent service, in thanks for all that God has given, and keep his commandments in remembrance of the love and providence and purpose of the Creator, the God and Father of us all, the organizer and operator of heaven and earth, without whom all these things would not be so. Thank God for all this: for life and what sustains it, for loved ones that make it meaningful, for faith and purpose and continuance, always and forever. Thank God for all of this-- and much, much more.

November 15, 2007

Joseph F. Smith, Quoted in "Live in Thanksgiving Daily" by Joseph B. Wirthlin. Ensign, September 2001, 6

The grateful man sees so much in the world to be thankful for, and with him the good outweighs the evil. Love overpowers jealousy, and light drives darkness out of his life. Pride destroys our gratitude and sets up selfishness in its place. How much happier we are in the presence of a grateful and loving soul, and how careful we should be to cultivate, through the medium of a prayerful life, a thankful attitude toward God and man!

November 09, 2007

Gordon B. Hinckley, "The Need for Greater Kindness." Ensign, May 2006, 58-61

There is no end to the good we can do, to the influence we can have with others. Let us not dwell on the critical or the negative. Let us pray for strength; let us pray for capacity and desire to assist others. Let us radiate the light of the gospel at all times and all places, that the Spirit of the Redeemer may radiate from us.

November 01, 2007

John K. Carmack, "Unmeasured Factors of Success." Life in the Law, 2004, 26

Integrity involves the concept of a whole and integrated person, all of his or her parts acting harmoniously, honestly, and completely. The decisions of such a person are honest and wise, their effect on the lives of others carefully considered.

October 12, 2007

C.S. Lewis, Quoted in "Lawyers and the Atonement" by Thomas B. Griffith. Life in the Law, 2004, 238

The Load, or weight, or burden of my neighbor's glory should be laid on my back, a load so heavy that only humility can carry it...It is a serious thing to live in a society of possible gods and goddesses, to remember that the dullest and most uninteresting person you can talk to may one day be a creature which, if you saw it now, you would be strongly tempted to worship...It is in the light of these overwhelming possibilities, it is with the awe and circumspection proper to them, that we should conduct all our dealings with one another, all friendships, all loves, all plays, all politics. There are no ordinary people. You have never talked to a mere mortal...Next to the Blessed Sacrament itself, your neighbor is the holiest object presented to your senses.

September 15, 2007

Martin Luther King Jr., Quoted in "Pure Religion" by Stephen A. West. Life in the Law, 2004, 130

A religion true to its nature must also be concerned about man's social conditions. Religion deals with both earth and heaven, both time and eternity. Religion operates not only on the vertical plane but also on the horizontal. It seeks not only to integrate men with God but to integrate men with men and each man with himself.

August 16, 2007

Ralph R. Mabey, "Just Lawyers." Life in the Law, 2004, 194

I have one other radical suggestion for you on the practice of law. This time you can all laugh out loud. You will be successful and you will be living the scriptural admonitions for lawyers and the law if you will practice the paradox of humility. You will be smarter, better, and more successful if you are humble. It makes you happier. Someone said, "Too many humble people are proud of it."

August 02, 2007

Dallin H. Oaks, "Weightier Matters." Life in the Law, 2004, 113

We do not improve our position in eternity just by flying farther and faster in mortality, but only by moving knowledgeably in the right direction.

August 02, 2007

D. Todd Christofferson, "Confirm Thy Soul in Self-Control." Life in the Law, 2004, 75

My plea is that we do what we can to inspire principled conduct and acceptance of responsibility, first in ourselves, next at home, and then wherever our influence extends. This is not simply for the great decisions and moments in life, but most important, in the minutiae of daily life.

July 26, 2007

John K. Carmack, "Unmeasured Factors of Success." Life in the Law, 2004, 31.

Great achievements require diligence, taking risks intelligently, and sometimes working around the clock. The standards and competition are high in our work. Yet people grow by courageously taking responsibility and discharging it. We should not shy away from our challenges.

July 19, 2007

Sheila K. McCleve, "The Other Side of Time," Clark Memorandum, Fall 2006, 20

I think if there is one piece of advice that I can give you today, one thing I hope you will take with you and remember and cherish throughout your lives, that one thing is not about time--it is about timelessness. It is about valuing the things that are timeless first and most.

June 28, 2007

Winston Churchill, 1940. Quoted in "Truth: A Shield to Memory" by Marion D. Hanks. Life in the Law, 2004, 155

The only guide to man is his conscience; the only shield to his memory is the rectitude and sincerity of his actions. It is very imprudent to walk through life without this shield, because we are so often mocked by the failure of our hopes and the upsetting of our calculations; but with this shield, however the fates may play, we march always in the ranks of honor.

June 21, 2007

Alexander B. Morrison, "A Caring Community: Goodness in Action," Ensign, Feb 1999, 13

How our world would be transformed if the vast reservoir of goodness in individuals could somehow be focused and harnessed for the uplift and betterment of society as a whole. As Archbishop Desmond Tutu has said, "Somehow the world is hungry for goodness and recognizes it when it sees it. ... There's something in all of us that hungers after the good and true" (quoted in Parade magazine, 11 Jan. 1998). I agree: goodness is the attribute most needed and longed for not only in our individual lives but also in families, communities, states, and nations.

June 14, 2007

James E. Faust, "The Study and Practice of the Laws of Men in Light of the Laws of God." Life in the Law. 2004. Pg. 36

In my opinion there need be no conflict between what the Savior has taught...and what you do as a professional lawyer. Indeed, if you are careful about observing the high moral standards..., you will stand out in your profession. Sir Thomas More did. Although he was beheaded, he fitted well the description of Job, "a perfect and an upright man, one that feareth God, and escheweth evil...and...holdeth fast his integrity" (Job 2:3). The great lawyers I have known have also had great souls.

May 31, 2007

Sheila K. McCleve, "The Other Side of Time," Clark Memorandum, Fall 2006, 23

Law--and life--is a fight, a battleground. The fight is real, and you are right in the middle of it. I quote form Ephesians 6:12: "For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places." You are in a profession that is adversarial, and you will be fighting the fight, and we believe and expect you to be able to do it. Don't forget the battle is real. Continue to learn, to serve, and to remember and appreciate what you have been given here to enable you to do it.

May 17, 2007

Thomas S. Monson, "In Quest of the Abundant Life," Ensign, Mar 1988, 2

Let us not overlook obedience to the laws of the land. They do not restrict our conduct so much as they guarantee our freedom, provide us protection, and safeguard all that is dear to us. In our time, when otherwise honorable men bend the law, twist the law, and wink at violations of the law, when crime goes unpunished, legally imposed sentences go unserved, and irresponsible and illegal conduct soars beyond previously recorded heights, there is a very real need to return to the basic justice that the laws provide when honest men sustain them.

May 03, 2007

Rex E. Lee, "A Lawyer Whose Client Is the United States," Ensign, Jun 1976, 53

My testimony and understanding of the restored gospel and my government service have each benefited from the other. My experience here has sharpened and illumined my appreciation of the Prophet Joseph Smith's admiration for our constitutional protections of individual rights, and President J. Reuben Clark, Jr's., concern for the intricate problems arising out of the separation of powers. Our constitutional system is deeply rooted and highly resilient, but no system of government in which ultimate power and authority are vested in the people can endure without the continuing involvement of citizens to whom good government is important.

April 19, 2007

James E. Faust, "'He Restoreth My Soul'." Ensign, Oct 1997, 2

There seems to be a great need for a restoration of goodness and decency in the souls of many throughout the world. Could not much goodness be brought about in our societies by members of the Church individually, humbly, wisely, and persuasively adhering to their convictions at all times and under all circumstances? It could be brought about by the young lawyer who has the courage to let his voice be heard as a voice of reason to remind others that there are no "victimless crimes." ... This would be the beginning of a different kind of a revolution. It would be a revolution of thought and purpose. It would be a quiet revolution, with each individual acting independently and courageously in his or her own peace of conscience. This kind of moral courage does not destroy one's credibility. It enhances it. Acting in harmony with our own conscience and beliefs is fundamental to our own inner peace and security.

April 12, 2007

Robert S. Wood, "On the Responsible Self," Ensign, Mar. 2002, 27

We are among the most blessed people in all of history. There is no place for complaining, no excuse for inaction, no "escape from freedom." Being so richly blessed, we have the responsibility to be a blessing to others, to our nation, to the world. When we stand at the great judgment bar of Jehovah, He may ask: Did we honor our personal responsibility? Did we bear the burdens of our neighbors? Did we heal? Did we comfort? Did we bring peace? Did we instill virtue? Did we spend ourselves in the service and uplift of mankind? May we at that day be able to answer in the affirmative and then hear the words pronounced, "Well done, thou good and faithful servant. Enter into my rest.

April 05, 2007

Dallin H. Oaks, "The Divinely Inspired Constitution," Ensign, Feb. 1992, 68

Those who enjoy the blessings of liberty under a divinely inspired constitution should promote morality, and they should practice what the Founding Fathers called "civic virtue." In his address on the U.S. Constitution, President Ezra Taft Benson quoted this important observation by John Adams, the second president of the United States: "Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other." The personal righteousness of citizens will strengthen a nation more than the force of its arms.

March 22, 2007

Robert S. Wood, "On the Responsible Self," Ensign, Mar. 2002, 27

There is a fairy tale about a king who offered the hand of his daughter in marriage to the young man who would do or create the most extraordinary, unbelievable thing. Young men from all over the kingdom brougth to the royal city marvelous works of mind and hand and tremendous demonstrations of physical agility. Finally, one young man created a tremendous clock that not only told the minutes, hours, days, months, and years, but also had carved within it the figures of the great poets, philosophers, and prophets of history, who on the appointed hours expounded the wisdom of the ages. The people exclaimed, "What an unbelievable thing!" But then another young man appeared on the scene, who, sledgehammer in hand, began to destroy the masterpiece. Again the people exclaimed--this time in horror--"Why, this is the most unbelievable thing we've seen!" And so it appeared that the king was to be compelled to hand his daughter over to the ruffian. But, this being a fairy tale, suddenly all the stone figures reassembled, became flesh, and drove the young man from the town. When I first read this tale to one of my daughters, she asked, "What was everyone doing while the young man was wrecking the clock?" A very sensible question! For too many, responsibility seems to end with hand-wringing and exclamations of dismay. Yet talk without action accomplishes little. We need to be vigorously engaged in the world. If our schools are inadequate or destructive of moral values, we must work with fellow members of the community to bring about change. If our neighborhoods are unsafe or unhealthy, we must join with the civic-minded to devise solutions. If our cities and towns are polluted, not only with noxious gases but soul-destroying addictions and smut, we must labor to find legitimate ways to eliminate such filth while respecting freedom of conscience.

March 08, 2007

President James E. Faust, J. Reuben Clark Law Society Fireside, February 28, 2003

Before the wounds of injustice can heal, there must first come a feeling of peace. So, in a sense, a lawyer who helps make peace becomes something of a healer. A good beginning for settling controversy is to try to lower the tension between the real parties in interest.

February 22, 2007

President James E. Faust, J. Reuben Clark Law Society Fireside, February 28, 2003

Our lawyers need to be more than successful advocates. We need to bring our sacred religious convictions and standards to the practice of law. To do otherwise would bring an inconsistency to our character. There always needs to be a connection between having an involvement in the law and living the gospel. In a sense we are all 'able ministers of the new testament; not of the letter, but of the spirit: for the letter killeth, but the spirit giveth life.'

February 15, 2007

President James E. Faust, J. Reuben Clark Law Society Fireside, February 28, 2003

To those of you who are practitioners a few simple suggestions learned the hard way over half a century at the bar might include:

  • Don't get so overly involved in your client's cause that you lose your balance, good judgment, and sense of humor.
  • Sublimate your own ego to the greater need of helping your client.
  • At all costs, keep your own integrity.
  • Don't let your client establish the rules of your conduct.
  • Communicate. Keep your client informed, and without compromising your client's cause, keep communication open with your opponent.
  • Never commingle other people's money with your own.
  • Protect yourself by making an adequate record.
This can all be summed up in the principle that we should never do anything to offend the spirit.

January 25, 2007

President James E. Faust, J. Reuben Clark Law Society Fireside, February 28, 2003

To be fully successful in the law, one does not have to be brilliant or exceptionally gifted. The most effective work of the world is done by ordinary people who put forth extraordinary effort. This is true of lawyers. Our strengths are magnified with experience and inspiration.

January 18, 2007

Abraham Lincoln,

There is a vague popular belief that lawyers are necessarily dishonest. I say vague, because when we consider to what extent confidence and honors are reposed in and conferred upon lawyers by the people, it appears improbable that their impression of dishonesty is very distinct and vivid. Yet the impression is common, almost universal. Let no young man choosing the law for a calling for a moment yield to the popular belief-resolve to be honest at all events; and if in your own judgment you cannot be an honest lawyer, resolve to be honest without being a lawyer.

January 11, 2007

President James E. Faust, J. Reuben Clark Law Society Fireside, February 28, 2003

In our own standards of personal conduct we must remember that the laws of men are the lesser law. I cite to you that the laws of many jurisdictions do not require or encourage being a Good Samaritan. As I have said before, there is a great risk in justifying what we do individually and professionally on the basis of what is "legal" rather than what is "right." In so doing, we put our very souls at risk. The philosophy that what is "legal" is also "right" will rob us of what is highest and best in our nature. What conduct is actually "legal" is, in many instances, way below the standards of a civilized society and light years below the teachings of the Christ. If you accept what is "legal" as your standard of personal or professional conduct, you will deny yourself of that which is truly noble in your personal dignity and worth.

August 03, 2006

Thomas B. Griffith, "Lawyers and the Atonement", Life in the Law, p. 238

The rule of law, the idea that each human being is entitled to the protection of the law, is most firmly rooted and grounded when we approach an understanding of what the Savior has done for each human being. Thus, the calling of lawyers is to build communities based on the rule of law, communities that reach us in the direction of a Zion society, a place where the power of the Atonement unites us.

July 27, 2006

Constance K. Lundberg, "The Ethical Professional: Consecration in the Workplace", Life in the Law, pp. 184-85

I believe that is the way consecration figures in our professional lives. It is not an artificial or externally imposed thing. But, by bringing understanding and love to our contacts with others-clients, opponents, judges-we can share those things most sacred to us-the spirit of the Savior, the eternal concepts of Christ's love and the atonement-not through preaching, but through demonstration, not by announcement, but by letting others feel its sweetness and peace. I believe that we cannot perform immoral acts and pursue unethical courses if we remain true to that spirit as we bring it to our daily service.

July 20, 2006

Ralph R. Mabey, "Just Lawyers", Life in the Law, p. 188

There is something profound in the purpose of our laws when seen in this context. Even the criminal laws are there to unify us in obedience to those laws and, in the event of a breach of the criminal law, to reconcile the offender with the rest of society, to reconcile that offender through enforcement of the law. Scripture recognizes that this is the purpose of the civil law. By "civil law," I mean the secular law. Doctrine and Covenants 134:6 says of our laws: We believe that every man should be honored in his station, rulers and magistrates as such, being placed for the protection of the innocent and the punishment of the guilty; and that to the laws all men show respect and deference, as without them peace and harmony would be supplanted by anarchy and terror; human laws being instituted for the express purpose of regulating our interests as individuals and nations, between man and man; and divine laws given of heaven, prescribing rules on spiritual concerns, for faith and worship, both to be answered by man to his Maker What is meant here? Harmonize? Bring peace between human beings? The purpose of the law, according to scripture, is to unify us.

July 13, 2006

Constance K. Lundberg, "The Ethical Professional: Consecration in the Workplace", Life in the Law, p. 177

In the scriptures, consecration has two forms. One can consecrate himself, his time, talents, and service. King David called the people to build the temple: "And who then is willing to consecrate his service this day unto the Lord?" (1 Chronicles 29:5). Or one can consecrate one's wealth, as Christ commanded the rich man, and as saints did in the primitive Church and in the early days of the latterday Church. Both forms of consecration are partial obedience to the first commandment, as explained by Moses in Deuteronomy. Both forms require both giving and receiving. Again, Dr. Nibley explains the offerings required of the Israelites: The great gathering and feasts, whose strict observance makes up such an important part of the old law, all have the same purpose, to remind the Israelites that everything they had was a free gift from God. In holding these solemn conferences "you and your sons, daughters, servants, . . . strangers, orphans, widows must all come together and rejoice and be happy," as one big happy family. That is the spirit in which this must be done, and that is the spirit of the law of consecration and the United Order. "Remember that thou wast a bondman in Egypt,"if some are slaves, all are slaves. This is to show where we stand with each other and the Lord. How does this translate into your lives as professionals? First, you must share your gifts,knowledge, skills, talents,with others in need, whether or not they can pay for your services. Lawyers and doctors have professional obligations to provide service pro bono publico, for the good of the public. Does this mean you oppress the poor until four o'clock Friday afternoon and then spend one hour giving nonreimbursed service to a poor person? I think not. Neither do I think it means providing service to the poor only when someone else (Legal Services, Medicare, the Peace Corps) pays you to do so.

July 06, 2006

Marion G. Romney, "A Christ Like Attitude", Life in the Law, p. 246-47

For present purposes, I would like to make only three observations. First, neither your obligation to your client nor any other professional obligation should ever require you to be dishonest or in any other respect to compromise your integrity. Your professional responsibilities neither require nor permit you to deal in overt falsehood or misrepresentation, and if your client insists that you do, get another client. I doubt that any of you will ever have a harder choice to make in this respect than President Clark had on one occasion. I hope that you will make it the same way he did. After many years of struggling, it finally appeared that his chances for success might be realized when he became legal counsel to the first of this country's multi-national corporations. The corporation changed presidents, however, and the new president insisted on taking some steps that were beyond the bounds of what integrity would permit. President Clark had to choose between his conscience and financial success. In the words of the biographer of his law school and professional years, Brother Frank Fox, Reuben let "the dream [of financial success] go glimmering." Second, even beyond the requirements of truth telling, service to the client and his interests seldom requires the lawyer to sacrifice the kind of civility that is consistent with the Savior's instruction that we should love all people, including our enemies. All too often, practicing lawyers confuse the pursuit of their clients' interests with lack of courtesy and thoughtfulness toward the opposing lawyer. Most of the time, the two are unrelated. Rarely, if ever, will a client's interests be advanced by rudeness or discourtesy. Do not discard, as a lawyer, those basic attitudes of concern for other people that you have come to regard as the foundation stone of virtue in general. Third, integrity means being prepared to say or do what must be said or done, regardless of the consequences. After the Savior fed the 5,000, many of those who had been fed followed Him to Capernaum. The Savior knew that they followed Him because He had fed them and would be offended if He declared Himself to be the promised Messiah. Nevertheless, He declared: I am the bread of life: he that cometh to me shall never hunger; and he that believeth on me shall never thirst (John 6:35).

June 29, 2006

Marion G. Romney, "A ChristLike Attitude", Life in the Law, p. 246

The first characteristic of a Christlike advocate is integrity. I speak of integrity in its broadest sense. No characteristic is more highly prized by members of the legal profession. Integrity certainly means honesty, but I believe it includes more than honesty. It includes that cornerstone principle of the Savior's life and teachings, a concern for other people. The reason I give such a broad meaning to integrity is that the word means "completeness" or "wholeness." I can think of no better formula for the complete person than the one the Savior gave: to love our Heavenly Father and to love other people as ourselves. But how, you may ask, can concern, respect, and even love for other people be reconciled with a lawyer's duty to vigorously represent his client? I recognize that there is a potential tension between a lawyer's duty to represent his client and his obligations to other lawyers and to society as a whole. There are times when this tension will present some difficult problems. (Those kinds of problems are outside the scope of this evening's discussion, though I would urge, parenthetically, that when those problems arise, you not hesitate to discuss them with more experienced members of the bar. You will find your professional colleagues more willing to be helpful in that respect than you might have anticipated.)

June 21, 2006

Thomas B. Griffith, "Lawyers and the Atonement", Life in the Law, p. 238

The rule of law, the idea that each human being is entitled to the protection of the law, is most firmly rooted and grounded when we approach an understanding of what the Savior has done for each human being. Thus, the calling of lawyers is to build communities based on the rule of law, communities that reach us in the direction of a Zion society, a place where the power of the Atonement unites us.

June 01, 2006

Thomas B. Griffith, "Lawyers and the Atonement", Life in the Law, p. 236

Here is the insight I offer for you to consider. To build a community that extends beyond your family or congregation-and I believe we are compelled by our understanding of the Atonement of our Savior to do just that-involves the law. Properly understood, the highest and most noble role of a lawyer, then, is to help build communities founded on the rule of law. By doing so, lawyers are participating in the redeeming work of the atoning power of the Savior at its zenith. To be sure, the working out of the power of the Atonement occurs initially at the intimate level of a sinner realizing her individual need for God's grace. But it must also ultimately include creating a community based on the rule of law. The rule of law is the idea, of staggering importance in the progress of humankind, that a community should not be organized according to the principle that might makes right. Rather, a community and its laws should reflect the reality that each person is a son or daughter of God and by virtue of that fact alone is entitled to be treated with dignity, respect, and fairness. The most famous and influential expression of this radical idea came from the pen of Thomas Jefferson, Virginia's greatest son and the founder of my other alma mater: We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness. That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed.

May 17, 2006

Ralph R. Mabey, Just Lawyers, Life in the Law, p. 195

It isn't that there is a religious life we live and a lawyer's life we live and that we'd better try to reconcile them as best we can. No, I'm proposing something maybe a little more dramatic: that they are the same life, that your calling as a lawyer under e pluribus unum is part of your calling as a disciple of Christ under Romans 12:5.

May 10, 2006

Ralph R. Mabey, Just Lawyers, Life in the Law, p. 194

I have one other radical suggestion for you on the practice of law. This time you can all laugh out loud. You will be successful and you will be living the scriptural admonitions for lawyers and the law if you will practice the paradox of humility. You will be smarter, better, and more successful if you are humble. It makes you happier. Someone said, "Too many humble people are proud of it." So I can't speak for myself. But I speak for you, brothers and sisters. (In general priesthood meeting last October, Bishop Richard C. Edgley spoke of the paradox or irony that strength comes from humility.) The way you become the best trial lawyer you can is with the humility to learn from what that witness tells you, to learn how that other attorney does it. You may say, "Michael Jordan, he's not humble. He says, 'Give me the ball.'" And that's what a good lawyer says: "Give me the ball." How did Michael Jordan come to want to get the ball and to know what to do with it? He did it through the humility of working harder than others, of learning everything about his opponents, of learning every move from the other guy and employing it. There is the paradox in humility.

December 03, 2003

Ralph R. Mabey, Just Lawyers, Life in the Law, pp. 188-89

I submit, brothers and sisters, that that is the purpose of a lawyer: to unify us under the law or reconcile us with the law. And only one of you laughed out loud. I would expect more of you to laugh out loud. It seems counterintuitive to the way we picture lawyers. But I want you to think about this because I submit to you that it is true. I believe with this purpose in mind that lawyers are to unify the Lord said: We believe that men should appeal to the civil law for redress of all wrongs and grievances, where personal abuse is inflicted or the right of property or character infringed, where such laws exist as will protect the same [and such appeals are made by lawyers]; but we believe that all men are justified in defending themselves, their friends, and property, and the government, from the unlawful assaults and encroachments of all persons in times of exigency, where immediate appeal cannot be made to the laws, and relief afforded (Doctrine and Covenants 134:11). To put it another way, no law enforces itself, no law interprets itself. If the purpose of the law is e pluribus unum, then the purpose of a lawyer is to effect e pluribus unum.

November 19, 2003

Constance K. Lundberg, The Ethical Professional: Consecration in the Workplace, Life in the Law, pp. 184-85

I believe that is the way consecration figures in our professional lives. It is not an artificial or externally imposed thing. But, by bringing understanding and love to our contacts with others clients, opponents, judges we can share those things most sacred to us the spirit of the Savior, the eternal concepts of Christ's love and the atonement not through preaching, but through demonstration, not by announcement, but by letting others feel its sweetness and peace. I believe that we cannot perform immoral acts and pursue unethical courses if we remain true to that spirit as we bring it to our daily service.

November 10, 2003

Constance K. Lundberg, "The Ethical Professional: Consecration in the Workplace," Life in the Law, pp. 182-83

Here is the real challenge of the consecration of a profession. It is so easy to be moral in the abstract; so much harder in the dirty, raging, hate-filled reality that is muttering and swearing a blue streak in your office. Moses didn't get nice, clean, well-educated, upper-middle-class Hebrews. He got illiterate, superstitious slaves. As he reminded them in Deuteronomy, they were not the chosen people because they were more pure, more upright than others. But from these people came the seeds of the people of the covenant -- they preserved the scriptures through war and pestilence. Finally, they were the family of the Savior. By the same token, Paul didn't get a nice, clean, well-behaved BYU ward in Corinth. He thanked God he didn't baptize the Corinthians, because they are so quarrelsome (1 Corinthians 1:14-15). He found the Corinthians carnal, envying, and full of strife and division (1 Corinthians 3:3). They were greedy, withholding support for missionary work and for the Church, but providing for themselves (1 Corinthians 4:10-14). What did Paul find in these quarrelsome and sinful Corinthians? He found them epistles from God, written on the fleshy tables of his heart (2 Corinthians 3). As professionals, you will minister to the needy, the weary, those who are falling by the wayside. The whole do not come to the healer. If you wish to share a common commitment for the good, as described by Shaffer and Bellah, after Aristotle, you will have to look carefully. And it will not be enough to say it is a miracle of God that good could come from such people. They are the children of God, and you have consecrated your time and talents to serve them, to bring them into goodness.

November 03, 2003

Constance K. Lundberg, "The Ethical Professional: Consecration in the Workplace", Life in the Law, p. 177

In the scriptures, consecration has two forms. One can consecrate himself, his time, talents, and service. King David called the people to build the temple: "And who then is willing to consecrate his service this day unto the Lord?" (1 Chronicles 29:5). Or one can consecrate one's wealth, as Christ commanded the rich man, and as saints did in the primitive Church and in the early days of the latter-day Church. Both forms of consecration are partial obedience to the first commandment, as explained by Moses in Deuteronomy. Both forms require both giving and receiving. Again, Dr. Nibley explains the offerings required of the Israelites: The great gathering and feasts, whose strict observance makes up such an important part of the old law, all have the same purpose, to remind the Israelites that everything they had was a free gift from God. In holding these solemn conferences -- you and yours -- sons, daughters, servants, . . . strangers, orphans, widows must all come together and rejoice and be happy, as one big happy family. That is the spirit in which this must be done, and that is the spirit of the law of consecration and the United Order. "Remember that thou wast a bondman in Egypt"-- if some are slaves, all are slaves. This is to show where we stand with each other and the Lord. How does this translate into your lives as professionals? First, you must share your gifts -- knowledge, skills, talents --with others in need, whether or not they can pay for your services. Lawyers and doctors have professional obligations to provide service pro bono publico for the good of the public. Does this mean you oppress the poor until four o'clock Friday afternoon and then spend one hour giving nonreimbursed service to a poor person? I think not. Neither do I think it means providing service to the poor only when someone else (Legal Services, Medicare, the Peace Corps) pays you to do so.

October 27, 2003

Rex E. Lee, "Lawyer as Policy Maker", Life in the Law: Answering God's Interrogatories, p. 171

Remember that like any great edifice, a lawyer's reputation cannot be quickly built, but it can be quickly destroyed. Remember also that there are enormous opportunities and temptations to trade long-range benefits, including your reputation, for short-term advantages. It is the same kind of trade-off that Jacob proposed to Esau some three millennia past. It was not a good deal then, and it hasn't improved with age. So I'm hopeful that in your dealings with your fellow lawyers you will always lean a little on the careful side. When those opportunities come, as they surely will, to harvest an advantage in a particular case at the cost of your long-range relationship with your fellow lawyers: Don't do it.

October 26, 2003

Ralph R. Mabey, Just Lawyers, Life in the Law, p. 188

There is something profound in the purpose of our laws when seen in this context. Even the criminal laws are there to unify us in obedience to those laws and, in the event of a breach of the criminal law, to reconcile the offender with the rest of society, to reconcile that offender through enforcement of the law. Scripture recognizes that this is the purpose of the civil law. By "civil law," I mean the secular law. Doctrine and Covenants 134:6 says of our laws: We believe that every man should be honored in his station, rulers and magistrates as such, being placed for the protection of the innocent and the punishment of the guilty; and that to the laws all men show respect and deference, as without them peace and harmony would be supplanted by anarchy and terror; human laws being instituted for the express purpose of regulating our interests as individuals and nations, between man and man; and divine laws given of heaven, prescribing rules on spiritual concerns, for faith and worship, both to be answered by man to his Maker (emphasis added). What is meant here? Harmonize? Bring peace between human beings? The purpose of the law, according to scripture, is to unify us.

October 20, 2003

Carl S. Hawkins, Professional Service as a Christian Ministry, Life in the Law: Answering God's Interrogatories, p. 166

There are two paths you can travel in seeking to accommodate your professional calling and your religious beliefs. One is the path of delusion and segmentation; the other is the path of reconciliation and integration. The path of reconciliation is the harder way, but it is the truthful way. The easy way is the delusion that you can separate your Christian aspirations from that part of yourself that is engaged in earning a living. It is easier because you can then let the secular world define your professional role for you, and you can limit your professional aspirations by the ethics of role. The study of professional ethics for lawyers is a serious and worthwhile part of your legal education. Professional ethics will lift your standards above the daily mores of commerce and politics, but they cannot be substituted for your Christian aspirations if you want to be at a peace with yourself.

October 13, 2003

Carl S. Hawkins, Professional Service as a Christian Ministry, Life in the Law: Answering God's Interrogatories, p. 164

Another obstacle to viewing law school as preparation for a service ministry will be the daily grind of law school itself. Many of you will have to work harder than you ever have before. There will be stress and anxiety caused by having to learn new ways of thinking, aggravated by a lack of adequate feedback on how you are doing. Your sense of security and, for some of you, even your sense of worth may be threatened temporarily as you seem to be competing in faster company than ever before. And very little that goes on from day to day in the classroom will remind you of the higher aspirations of a Christian ministry. Most of your learning efforts will be spent on acquiring secular knowledge of the law and developing the lawyer's tough-minded skills of analysis and advocacy. You will have to keep in mind that such knowledge and skill are indispensable preparation for an effective life of professional service, even if they are not enough to fulfill your higher aspirations. Your preparation at this Law School will be no less rigorous than at other good law schools. That sometimes disappoints some of our students, who seem to expect that, because this is a church-sponsored school, and because they are religious persons, their professional development should come easier by some special dispensation without having to work for it, or else they suppose that their religious beliefs will somehow make them superior lawyers without having to acquire all of the tedious knowledge and hard skills that are required of less pious lawyers. That is, of course, a perversion of our religious beliefs.

October 06, 2003

Marion D. Hanks, Truth: A Shield to Memory, Life in the Law: Answering God's Interrogatories, p. 156

There is before anyone who is in the practice of the law the absolute certainty of many difficult questions and the absolute assurance that, if we are committed clearly and early to the idea that there are some things that are wrong and some things that are right, we will make those decisions with correctness and integrity and the shield of memory and conscience that will permit us to live.

CONNECT